Look for New Risk Categories and Beyond-Use Dates With USP 797

Look for New Risk Categories and Beyond-Use Dates With USP 797

These revisions differ from the existing chapter in some significant ways — both structure and content. These changes, at least some of them, will undoubtedly require the pharmacy system and processes to undergo some significant adjustments. Although, many of the variations will be easier to implement. The changes are set to become official and take effect on December 1, Public comments on these changes are no longer heard, but we can still take a look at some of the most significant changes that will take effect in less than a year. CSP Compounded Sterile Preparation classification has witnessed a significant overhaul with these proposed changes. The current system classifies CSP as either low, medium, or high risk.

A Summary of Proposed Changes to USP 797

It is conducted at least annually thereafter for low- and medium-risk compounding and semiannually for high-risk compounding. This test is performed because direct touch contamination is the most likely source of introducing microorganisms into CSPs. The gloved fingertip test is performed immediately after the compounding employee completes the hand hygiene and garbing procedures. This test must be performed on three separate occasions with absolutely no CFU growth within the required incubation period.

Retesting is required annually for those compounders mixing low- and medium-risk preparations and semiannually for high-risk preparations. For the retesting, the gloved fingertip test is performed following the media fill.

The subject of “beyond use dating” for compounded sterile preparations published in USP-NF 27 has has specific requirements that must be met.

The chapter was to have become official on December 1, , but USP-NF announced on September 23, , that appeals were pending on provisions of the chapter regarding beyond-use dating, use of alternative technologies proven equivalent to those described in the chapter, and applicability of the chapter to veterinary practitioners. This notice and content of this program will be updated as events occur. Compounding has been a fundamental aspect of providing medicines to patients for centuries.

Physicians, chemists, and pharmacists manipulated naturally derived products including those of plant, mineral, and animal origin into medicines. They did this through mixing, grinding, filtering, percolating, heating, and distilling, which led to preparations of vinegars, extracts, infusions, elixirs, syrups, tinctures, ointments, and pills. Today, compounding has made a resurgence because of many drug shortages in recent years; the need for customized drug formulations as a result of allergies; special dosage forms for pediatric patients, geriatric patients, and special needs populations; and the movement toward specialty and personalized medicines.

797 Beyond Use Dating Chart – New Usp Doesnt Provide For Bud Extensions

Alternative Date. General Industrial OEM. Off-Highway Vehicles. USP is the standard in place governing the sterile chart of compounded pharmaceuticals. USP covers the compounding of both hazardous and nonhazardous drugs with a focus on the compounding of sterile compounds and environments from contamination.

One significant change to the standards in the revised is that there are no They have a beyond use date (BUD) of 12 hours or less at.

This chapter provides procedures and requirements for compounding sterile preparations. Sterile compounding also requires cleaner facilities; specific training and testing of personnel in principles and practices of aseptic manipulations; air quality evaluation and maintenance; and sound knowledge of sterilization and solution stability principles and practices.

Aqueous injections for administration into the vascular and central nervous systems pose the greatest risk of harm to patients if there are issues of nonsterility and large errors in ingredients. The intent of this chapter is to prevent harm and fatality to patients that could result from microbial contamination nonsterility , excessive bacterial endotoxins, large content errors in the strength of correct ingredients, and incorrect ingredients in CSPs.

The quality control and testing for CSPs in this chapter are appropriate and necessary. The content of this chapter applies to health care institutions, pharmacies, physician practice facilities, and other facilities in which CSPs are prepared, stored, and dispensed. For the purposes of this chapter, CSPs include any of the following:.

Preparations prepared according to the manufacturer’s labeled instructions and other manipulations when manufacturing sterile products that expose the original contents to potential contamination.

Using a Pharmacy Glove Box for Compounding Sterile Preparations

The most recent revisions implement new standards and revise existing ones based on recent scientific and technological developments. Significant changes include:. In light of the new standards, pharmacies should evaluate the physical capabilities of their compounding facilities to ensure they can meet the demands of the revised requirements.

INVSterile Compounding. NAME. PERMIT NUMBER. DATE OF INSPECTION Beyond-use date does not exceed 28 days for multiple-dose containers after Personnel garbing requirements are followed for CAIs unless manufacturer.

To support compounding of products that are sterile and chemically stable, beyond use dating of admixtures must include a thorough evaluation of appropriate resources. In most instances, resources provide documentation of a specific compounded admixture, at a specific concentration and storage parameters, that does not coincide with current operations or patient-specific requirements. To meet the operational demands of a pharmacy, institutions employ a referenced guideline approach to guide decision making for safe sterile admixing.

Often these guidelines are established and maintained at individual practicing locations with varying levels of detail and accuracy. In an effort to improve sterile compounding across a multihospital system, we developed and implemented beyond use dating guidelines to improve consistency and patient safety while meeting regulatory concerns.

Beyond use date BUD is the date after which a compounded preparation shall not be used, and it is set based on the date on which the preparation was compounded. To support compounding of products that are both sterile and chemically stable, beyond use dating of sterile compounded admixtures must include a thorough evaluation of appropriate resources. Prior to admixing, literature should be evaluated to determine the chemical stability of each medication at a referenced concentration range, within a specified diluent, and stored at appropriate temperature within an appropriate container.

The chemical stability must also be cross-referenced with current US Pharmacopeial Convention standards to ensure that sterility is maintained throughout the storage period. It is important to note that BUDs and expiration dates are not the same.

Infusion – July/August 2017

Change beled strength and beyond-use dating per. Date, what is the usp store or transported. Health system that most pharmacies use dates bud. Footnote a beyond use date bud. Chapter defines bud should be stored or by contacting usp beyond use dating for sterile compounding compendium online at the absence of sterility.

In accordance with ACCME and ACPE Standards for Commercial Support, ASHP Update on USP Chapter: Strategies for Ensuring Compliance by What drives the assignment of the beyond‐use date (BUD).

Chapter in Pharmaceutical Compounding — Sterile Preparations issued by the US Pharmacopeia describes the guidelines, procedures and compliance requirements for compounding sterile preparations and sets the standards that apply to all settings in which sterile preparations are compounded. The clean room must include an attached anteroom at the same air quality level ISO Class 8 for movement of personnel and materials in and out of the clean room.

Building and operating a clean room can be an expensive and time-consuming proposition. Fortunately, pharmacies can also comply with requirements using a barrier isolator, also known as a glovebox. A glovebox isolator or barrier isolator provides a physical barrier between pharmacy personnel and the compounding activity.

Traditional clean benches and biosafety cabinets have an open front access area, where there is the possibility that disruptions in the room airflow or poor aseptic technique by the operator will introduce contaminants to the work area. A glove box provides an additional level of protection, as the sterile product is never exposed to the room environment or to compounding personnel directly. When using a glovebox, materials are passed into the main working chamber through an enclosed pass-thru chamber, and accessed through glove ports to perform aseptic manipulations.

Clean air is supplied to the work area through a HEPA filter, providing better than ISO Class 5 conditions under positive pressure within the glovebox. Gloveboxes offer the same or better air quality as a clean bench or biosafety cabinet located within a clean room, plus their design offers some significant advantages in both initial investment and ongoing operating expenses.

USP Chapter speaks to aseptic conditions for compounded sterile preparations; however the chapter does not cover in detail the risks to pharmacy personnel associated with handling cytotoxic or other hazardous drugs. For these special cases of CSPs, a negative pressure glovebox should be used to provide ISO Class 5 conditions while also protecting personnel from exposure. The Baker Company has also created an online library of links to articles and studies relevant to current trends and standards in pharmacy compounding.

Go to the Pharmacy Resource Center.

Three concepts that create a lot of confusion: stability, beyond-use date, expiration

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Please also note: USP Chapter provides a set of standards for assuring that compounded products Beyond-use date (BUD) and storage requirements.

A beyond-use date is a date placed on a prescription by a pharmacy for compounded medications they prepare, noting when that prescription should no longer be used. This date is determined by the pharmacy when they prepare a compound prescription based on different factors, including:. The beyond-use date is different than an expiration date of a drug. This includes moving a medication to a different container, which is the normal practice for pharmacies dispensing prescriptions.

Based on the type of drug, how fast it degrades, dosage, type of container, storage conditions, prescription length, the likelihood of contamination. Based on testing a drug in specific conditions related to storage containers, lighting, temperature, etc.

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